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Thermal for kids and babies for Fall 2016

Hi, I got some exciting news to share!  The main reason for starting Ella’s Wool a few years ago was that I could no longer stand to see the empty playgrounds here in Brooklyn during winter time. I was trying to find out why the kids and I practically were the only ones out playing, so I started to ask around how the other parents dressed their little ones. As a Norwegian, I have experienced (and survived!) 32 winters living in Norway before moving to the US. As I’m getting cold super fast, I've tested out all the different base layers at the marked. The one thing I found out, NOTHING beats merino wool when it comes to base layers....

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How we dressed Ella for school in the Norwegian winters

All the snow we've had on the East Coast lately, and the winter break that is coming up, reminded me of Ella's old nursery school, in Norway. It was a pretty large school, with five classes of 2- to 3-year-olds – Ella's age at the time – and several classes of 3-, 4- and 5-year-olds.  The school was housed in a big, old brick mansion. It had a yard about half an acre big, with apple trees and a large lawn, in addition to the swing sets, sand boxes and all the toys you would expect. In the winter, it was all covered in snow, but that didn’t stop anyone from playing outside. There were two small knolls in the yard. They were...

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How I take care of my wool

Ever since I got into this, I'm often asked how to care for our wool. I think, what people really mean when they ask is: Isn't it a huge pain in the neck? No, it's really not. Once you know a few basics, washing wool is no more of a hassle than washing a load of whites. The first thing to know, is that wool does not need to be washed as often as other fabrics. Unlike materials like cotton or linen, wool repels both moisture and bacteria, so nothing much really bites. Many spots can simply be brushed off, wiped off with a damp cloth or rinsed away with tap water. Afterwards, hang your wool to air out a little bit, and it will be as good...

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